A patient’s happiness and safety are of utmost importance. That means taking the time to listen, discussing goals and concerns, and working together to determine the ideal solution.

The best outcomes begin with a well-informed and empowered patient. Doing some research and preparation before your professional consultation will help guide the initial discussion, and help raise any concerns or questions you may have.

The information below is a great place to start learning about surgical and non-surgical cosmetic procedures. Just click on any of the options below to learn about the goals of the procedure, the possible risks, and the recovery time. Dr. Borsuk will provide answers to your questions, and guide you through the decision-making process.

Facelift

Goals of the Procedure
The goal of a facelift is to rejuvenate the face. This is done by softening wrinkles and folds in the skin and by tightening the tissues underneath the skin of the face. This is often done at the same time as a necklift.

Where are the scars?
Placement of scars will depend on the goals of the operation, which are decided on a case-by-case basis.

Scars are typically in front of the ear and go down around the ear lobe. They sometimes will continue backwards along the hairline.

Who is a good candidate?
You are a good candidate for this procedure if you have wrinkling of the skin of your face, nasolabial folds – commonly knows as smile or laugh lines – and/or jowels. This is most typical in people over the age of 50.

Who may not be a good candidate?
If you have significant medical conditions that are not well controlled with medication, you may wish to avoid elective surgery. Also, depending on which wrinkles bother you, you may be better suited to a non-surgical treatment, like Botox or fillers.

What are the risks?
With any surgical procedure, there are risks of bleeding and infection. Scars typically heal well, but may heal thicker or redder and so may benefit from further treatment after the procedure. There is a small risk that a nerve is damaged during the procedure, which can cause temporary or permanent facial drooping, abnormal mouth and eye movements and function, and/or change in facial sensation. The aesthetic outcome may not be exactly what you had wanted, and extra procedures may be needed to correct this that would carry a fee. The results may be asymmetrical. There are the risks of anesthesia, which include deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolus, and death, which is extremely rare.

What is the recovery time/down-time?
There will be significant swelling and bruising for about 2 weeks. You will be asked to refrain from any strenuous activity for this period.

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Eyelift

Goals of the Procedure
The goal of an eyelift, or blepharoplasty, is to rejuvenate the skin and tissues around the eyes.  This is done by removing extra skin, tightening skin and/or removing extra fat. Depending on your needs, just upper, just lower or both upper and lower eyelids can be treated.

Where are the scars?
Placement of scars will depend on the goals of the operation, which are decided on a case-by-case basis. There is typically a scar along the upper eyelid and a scar along the lower eyelid just under the eyelashes.

Who is a good candidate?
You are a good candidate for this procedure if you have excess eyelid skin and/or lower eyelid bags. This is most typical in people who are over the age of 40.

Who may not be a good candidate?
If you have significant medical conditions that are not well controlled with medication, you may wish to avoid elective surgery.

If you have any medical problems involving your eyes, you should speak to your ophthalmologist prior to considering any elective eyelid surgery. Dry eyes may get worse with surgery. If your eyelid is very loose, is hard to open all the way or disturbs your vision, you may be a better candidate for a functional procedure to help with your eyelid function.

What are the risks?
With any surgical procedure, there are risks of bleeding and infection. Scars typically heal well, but may heal thicker or redder and so may benefit from further treatment after the procedure. There is a small risk that a nerve is damaged during the procedure, which can cause temporary or permanent eyelid dysfunction and/or changes in sensation. Dry or itchy eyes can result from this procedure, as can the need for eye drops and/or patching. Loss of vision is a rare complication. The aesthetic outcome may not be exactly what you had wanted, and extra procedures may be needed to correct this that would carry a fee. The results may be asymmetrical. There are the risks of anesthesia, which include deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolus, and death, which is extremely rare.

What is the recovery time/down-time?
There will be significant swelling and bruising for about 2 weeks. You will be asked to refrain from any strenuous activity for this period.

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Necklift

Goals of the Procedure
The goal of a necklift is to tighten the skin of the neck and to make it smoother. This is done by softening wrinkles and skin folds, removing excess fatty tissues and sometimes by tightening the muscles of the neck underneath the skin. This is often done at the same time as a facelift.

Where are the scars?
Placement of scars will depend on the goals of the operation, which are decided on a case-by-case basis. Scars are typically in the groove behind the ear and continue into the hairline behind the ear. There is sometimes a scar just under the chin.

Who is a good candidate?
You are a good candidate for this procedure if you have excess skin on your neck. This is most typical in people over the age of 50.

Who may not be a good candidate?
If you have significant medical conditions that are not well controlled with medication, you may wish to avoid elective surgery. Also, depending on which wrinkles bother you, you may be better suited to a non-surgical treatment, like Botox or fillers.

What are the risks?
With any surgical procedure, there are risks of bleeding and infection. Scars typically heal well, but may heal thicker or redder and so may benefit from further treatment after the procedure. There is a small risk that a nerve is damaged during the procedure, which can cause temporary or permanent facial drooping, abnormal mouth movements and function, and/or change in sensation. The aesthetic outcome may not be exactly what you had wanted, and extra procedures may be needed to correct this that would carry a fee. The results may be asymmetrical. There are the risks of anesthesia, which include deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolus, and death, which is extremely rare.

What is the recovery time/down-time?
There will be significant swelling and bruising for about 2 weeks. You will be asked to refrain from any strenuous activity for this period.

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Breast Augmentation

Goals of the Procedure
The goal of a breast augmentation is to make the breasts larger. This is done by placing an implant, either salt water or silicone filled, into the breast.

Where are the scars?
Placement of scars will depend on the goals of the operation and what type of implant is chosen, which are decided on a case-by-case basis. The scar will be either in the fold underneath the breast or on the lower border of the areola.

Silicone or Saline?
Breast implants are made of a silicone shell filled with either silicone or saline, each having their benefits and detractors. Silicone implants tend to feel more natural, which is particularly important if you have little breast tissue to start with. Saline, on the other hand, can be placed through a smaller scar. During your consultation, we can discuss the benefits of each further, and find the implant that’s right for you.

Above or Below the Muscle?
Breast implants can be placed in front or behind the main muscle of the chest – the pectoralis major muscle.

Placing the implant behind the muscle means that there is more tissue padding the implant, which will make the implant less visible and palpable. This is particularly important if you have little breast tissue to start with.  It will also result in less capsular contracture, a scar like envelope that can form over months to years and can cause pain, firmness, and/or visibility of the implant.

Placing the implant in front of the muscle will avoid implant “animation”, the movement of the implant when the pectoralis major muscle is contracted. This may be important if you do a lot of weight lifting or muscle building.

Who is a good candidate?
You are a good candidate for this procedure if you would like larger breasts and do not have much drooping of your breasts. This is most typical in people who are between 20 and 40 years old. If you do have significant drooping, you may be a better candidate for a breast lift with or without an augmentation at the same time.

Who may not be a good candidate?
If you have significant medical conditions that are not well controlled with medication, you may wish to avoid elective surgery.

If you do have significant drooping of your breasts, you may be a better candidate for a breast lift with or without an augmentation at the same time.

What are the risks?
With any surgical procedure, there are risks of bleeding and infection. Scars typically heal well, but may heal thicker or redder and so may benefit from further treatment after the procedure. There is a small risk that a nerve is damaged during the procedure, which can cause temporary or permanent change in sensation to the nipple and a very small chance that part of, or all of the nipple could be lost. The aesthetic outcome may not be exactly what you had wanted, or the volume of your breasts may be different than you had expected, and extra procedures may be needed to correct this that would carry a fee. The results may be asymmetrical, in terms of volume, breast shape and/or nipple-placement. The breast implant may be visible or palpable under the skin. A capsule may form around the implant and, like a scar, may make the implant firm, painful or visible and may require a repeat procedure to treat. The implant may become infected and may require indefinite removal. If the implant is placed under the muscle, the implant may move (“animate”) during physical activity. There are the risks of anesthesia, which include deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolus, and death, which is extremely rare.

What is the recovery time/down-time?
There will be significant swelling and bruising for about 2 weeks. You will be asked to refrain from any strenuous activity for this period.

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Breast Lift

Goals of the Procedure
The goal of a breast lift, or mastopexy, is to improve the contour of the breasts, tighten the skin and lift the breasts to a higher level on the chest. This is usually done by removing some breast skin and lifting the nipple to a higher location.

Where are the scars?
Placement of scars will depend on the specific procedure that is right for you. Typically the scar will be around the nipple, around the nipple and straight down the breast, or around the nipple, straight down the breast and then along the fold underneath the breast, depending on how much tightening is required. This is decided on a case-by-case basis, and we will discuss this during your consultation.

Who is a good candidate?
You are a good candidate for this procedure if you are happy with the size of your breasts, but would like them to be higher on your chest and have a better, perkier shape. This is most typical in people who are between 30 and 60 years old, especially if you have breast-fed or if you have lost a significant amount of weight. If you have significant drooping of your breasts, but would also like larger breasts, you may be a better candidate for a breast lift with an augmentation at the same time.

Who may not be a good candidate?
If you have significant medical conditions that are not well controlled with medication, you may wish to avoid elective surgery.

If your breasts have a good shape in general, but you would prefer them to be larger, you may be a better candidate for a breast augmentation.

If you do have significant drooping of your breasts but would also like them to be larger, you may be a better candidate for a breast lift with an augmentation at the same time.

What are the risks?
With any surgical procedure, there are risks of bleeding and infection. Scars typically heal well, but may heal thicker or redder and so may benefit from further treatment after the procedure. There is a small risk that a nerve is damaged during the procedure, which can cause temporary or permanent change in sensation to the nipple and a very small chance that part of, or all of the nipple could be lost. The aesthetic outcome may not be exactly what you had wanted, or the volume of your breasts may be different than you had expected, and extra procedures may be needed to correct this that would carry a fee. The results may be asymmetrical, in terms of volume, breast shape and/or nipple-placement. There are the risks of anesthesia, which include deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolus, and death, which is extremely rare.

What is the recovery time/down-time?
There will be significant swelling and bruising for about 2 weeks. You will be asked to refrain from any strenuous activity for about 6 weeks.

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Breast Augmentation and Lift

Goals of the Procedure
The goal of a breast augmentation and lift or augmentation mastopexy is to make the breasts larger as well as to improve the contour of the breasts, tighten the skin and lift the breasts to a higher level on the chest. This is usually done by removing some breast skin and lifting the nipple to a higher location as well as by placing an implant, either salt water or silicone filled, into the breast.

Where are the scars?
Placement of scars will depend on the specific procedure that is right for you. Typically the scar will be around the nipple, around the nipple and straight down the breast, or around the nipple, straight down the breast and then along the fold underneath the breast, depending on how much tightening is required. This is decided on a case-by-case basis, and we will discuss this during your consultation.

Silicone or Saline?
Breast implants are made of a silicone shell filled with either silicone or saline, both having their benefits and detractors.

Silicone implants tend to feel more natural, which is particularly important if you have little breast tissue to start with. Saline, on the other hand, can be placed through a smaller scar. During your consultation, we can discuss the benefits of each further, and find the implant that’s right for you.

Above or Below the Muscle?
Breast implants can be placed in front or behind the main muscle of the chest – the pectoralis major muscle. Typically, in the setting of doing a breast lift and an augmentation at the same time, the implant is placed under the muscle. This is to preserve better blood flow to the tissues of the breast, which allow for better healing.

Who is a good candidate?
You are a good candidate for this procedure if you would like larger breasts and have some drooping of your breasts. This is most typical in people who are between 30 and 60 years old, especially if you have breast-fed or if you have lost a significant amount of weight. If you do have significant drooping, you may be a better candidate for a breast lift with or without an augmentation at the same time.

Who may not be a good candidate?
If you have significant medical conditions that are not well controlled with medication, you may wish to avoid elective surgery.

If your breasts have a good shape in general, but you would prefer them to be larger, you may be a better candidate for a breast augmentation alone.

If you do have significant drooping of your breasts, but would not like your breasts to be any larger, you may be a better candidate for a breast lift alone.

What are the risks?
With any surgical procedure, there are risks of bleeding and infection. Scars typically heal well, but may heal thicker or redder and so may benefit from further treatment after the procedure. There is a small risk that a nerve is damaged during the procedure, which can cause temporary or permanent change in sensation to the nipple and a very small chance that part of, or all of the nipple could be lost. The aesthetic outcome may not be exactly what you had wanted, or the volume of your breasts may be different than you had expected, and extra procedures may be needed to correct this that would carry a fee. The results may be asymmetrical, in terms of volume, breast shape and/or nipple-placement. The breast implant may be visible or palpable under the skin. A capsule may form around the implant and, like a scar, may make the implant firm, painful or visible and may require a repeat procedure to treat. The implant may become infected and may require indefinite removal. If the implant is placed under the muscle, the implant may move (“animate”) during physical activity. There are the risks of anesthesia, which include deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolus, and death, which is extremely rare.

What is the recovery time/down-time?
There will be significant swelling and bruising for about 2 weeks. You will be asked to refrain from any strenuous activity for about 6 weeks.

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Tummy Tuck

Goals of the Procedure
The goal of a tummy tuck, or abdominoplasty, is to improve the contour of tummy. This is usually done by removing excess skin and fat, tightening the rectus (“six-pack”) muscles, and re-draping the skin.

Where are the scars?
Typically the scar will be from hip to hip, low enough so that it can be covered by underwear or bathing suit bottoms. There will also be a scar around the belly button.

Who is a good candidate?
You are a good candidate for this procedure if you find you have excess skin and to a lesser extent excess fat of your abdomen. This is common after having children and/or having lost a significant amount of weight. This is most typical in people who are between 30 and 60 years old.

Who may not be a good candidate?
If you have significant medical conditions that are not well controlled with medication, you may wish to avoid elective surgery.

If you have good skin elasticity and only a small amount of excess fat, liposuction alone may be a better procedure for you.

If you have both excess skin and a significant amount of excess fat, though the tummy tuck procedure can reduce some of the fat and give good results, best results are achieved if you are able to lose some weight on your own before an operation.

What are the risks?
With any surgical procedure, there are risks of bleeding and infection. Scars typically heal well, but may heal thicker or redder and so may benefit from further treatment after the procedure. There is a small risk that a nerve is damaged during the procedure, which can cause temporary or permanent changes in sensation to the tummy or thigh skin. There is a very small chance that part of or all of the belly button could be lost, requiring dressing changes. The aesthetic outcome may not be exactly what you had wanted, and extra procedures may be needed to correct this that would carry a fee. The results may be asymmetrical in terms of overall appearance or belly-button placement. There can be non-infected fluid collections under the skin, which may require drainage. Some of the wound may be slow to heal, requiring dressing changes. Your abdomen may feel tight and you may have to walk hunched over for several weeks. There are the risks of anesthesia, which include deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolus, and death, which is extremely rare.

What is the recovery time/down-time?
There will be significant swelling and bruising for about 2 weeks. You will be asked to refrain from any strenuous activity for about 6 weeks, as well as to avoid lying completely flat or sitting up at 90 degrees.

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Arm Lift

Goals of the Procedure
The goal of an arm lift, or brachioplasty, is to improve the contour of upper arms. This is usually done by removing excess skin and fat of the upper arms.

Where are the scars?
Placement of scars will depend on the specific procedure that is right for you.

Typically the scar will be from the elbow up to the arm-pit. Sometimes the scar crosses the armpit in a zig-zag pattern and then goes onto the side of the chest. This will be decided on a case-by-case basis and we can discuss this during your consultation.

Who is a good candidate?
You are a good candidate for this procedure if you find you have excess skin and to a lesser extent excess fat on you arms. This is common after losing a significant amount of weight.

Who may not be a good candidate?
If you have significant medical conditions that are not well controlled with medication, you may wish to avoid elective surgery.

If you have both excess skin and a significant amount of excess fat, though the arm lift procedure can reduce some of the fat and give good results, best results are achieved if you are able to lose some weight on your own before an operation.  Alternately, liposuction alone may be done as a first operation before the arm lift.

What are the risks?
With any surgical procedure, there are risks of bleeding and infection. Scars typically heal well, but may heal thicker or redder and so may benefit from further treatment after the procedure. The scars are in a visible location, and are hard to hide. There is a small risk that a nerve is damaged during the procedure, which can cause temporary or permanent changes in sensation to the arm, or forearm and the scar can be painful. Very rarely, there can be decreased function, strength or range of motion of the elbow, wrist and/or hand. There is a risk of lymphedema, swelling in the arm that can be asymmetric and very difficult to treat. The aesthetic outcome may not be exactly what you had wanted, and extra procedures may be needed to correct this that would carry a fee. The results may be asymmetrical. There can be non-infected fluid collections under the skin, which may require drainage. Some of the wound may be slow to heal, requiring dressing changes. Your arm may feel tight for several weeks. There are the risks of anesthesia, which include deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolus, and death, which is extremely rare.

What is the recovery time/down-time?
There will be significant swelling and bruising for about 2 weeks. You will be asked to refrain from any strenuous activity for about 6 weeks.

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Inner Thigh Lift

Goals of the Procedure
The goal of an inner thigh lift is to improve the contour of the thighs. This is usually done by removing excess skin and fat from the inner thighs.

Where are the scars?
Placement of scars will depend on the specific procedure that is right for you.

Typically the scar will be from the knee to the groin.

Who is a good candidate?
You are a good candidate for this procedure if you find you have excess skin and to a lesser extent excess fat on your inner thighs. This is common after losing a significant amount of weight.

Who may not be a good candidate?
If you have significant medical conditions that are not well controlled with medication, you may wish to avoid elective surgery.

If you have both excess skin and a significant amount of excess fat, though the inner thigh lift procedure can reduce some of the fat and give good results, best results are achieved if you are able to lose some weight on your own before an operation.  Alternately, liposuction alone may be done as a first operation before the inner thigh lift.

What are the risks?
With any surgical procedure, there are risks of bleeding and infection. Scars typically heal well, but may heal thicker or redder and so may benefit from further treatment after the procedure. The scars are in a visible location, and are hard to hide. There is a small risk that a nerve is damaged during the procedure, which can cause temporary or permanent changes in sensation to the leg, and the scar can be painful. Very rarely, there can be decreased function, strength or range of motion of the knee, ankle and/or foot. There is a risk of lymphedema, swelling in the leg that can be asymmetric and very difficult to treat. The aesthetic outcome may not be exactly what you had wanted, and extra procedures may be needed to correct this that would carry a fee. The results may be asymmetrical. There can be non-infected fluid collections under the skin, which may require drainage. Some of the wound may be slow to heal, requiring dressing changes. Your legs may feel tight for several weeks. There are the risks of anesthesia, which include deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolus, and death, which is extremely rare.

What is the recovery time/down-time?
There will be significant swelling and bruising for about 2 weeks. You will be asked to refrain from any strenuous activity for about 6 weeks.

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Back Lift

Goals of the Procedure
The goal of a back lift, is to improve the contour of the back and bring up the buttocks. This is usually done by removing excess skin and fat and lifting the buttocks.

Where are the scars?
Typically the scar will be across the low back, low enough so that it can be covered by underwear or bathing suit bottoms.

Who is a good candidate?
You are a good candidate for this procedure if you find you have excess skin and to a lesser extent excess fat of your back, and that your buttocks have fallen. This is common after having lost a significant amount of weight.

This procedure is often done after an <abdominoplasty> procedure.

Who may not be a good candidate?
If you have significant medical conditions that are not well controlled with medication, you may wish to avoid elective surgery.

If you have both excess skin and a significant amount of excess fat, though the back lift procedure can reduce some of the fat and give good results, best results are achieved if you are able to lose some weight on your own before an operation.

What are the risks?
With any surgical procedure, there are risks of bleeding and infection. Scars typically heal well, but may heal thicker or redder and so may benefit from further treatment after the procedure. The scars may be in a visible location. There is a small risk that a nerve is damaged during the procedure, which can cause temporary or permanent changes in sensation. The aesthetic outcome may not be exactly what you had wanted, and extra procedures may be needed to correct this that would carry a fee. The results may be asymmetrical. There can be non-infected fluid collections under the skin, which may require drainage. Some of the wound may be slow to heal, requiring dressing changes. There are the risks of anesthesia, which include deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolus, and death, which is extremely rare.

What is the recovery time/down-time?
There will be significant swelling and bruising for about 2 weeks. You will be asked to refrain from any strenuous activity for about 6 weeks, as well as to avoid sitting up at 90 degrees.

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Liposuction

Goals of the Procedure
The goal of liposuction is to improve the contour of a given body area. This is done by removing fat through several small (approx. 1cm) incisions around the area to be treated.

Where are the scars?
Typically there are several small (approx. 1cm) scars around the area to be treated.

Who is a good candidate?
You are a good candidate for this procedure if you find you have excess fat in a particular area, but not very much excess skin. The areas best treated with liposuction are the flank, outer thighs and tummy. This is most typical in people who are over the age of 30.

Who may not be a good candidate?
If you have significant medical conditions that are not well controlled with medication, you may wish to avoid elective surgery.

If there is both excess fat and skin, you may be a better candidate for a procedure to help remove the excess skin surgically.

What are the risks?
With any surgical procedure, there are risks of bleeding and infection. Scars typically heal well, but may heal thicker or redder and so may benefit from further treatment after the procedure. There is a small risk that a nerve is damaged during the procedure, which can cause temporary or permanent changes in sensation to the area treated. The aesthetic outcome may not be exactly what you had wanted, and extra procedures may be needed to correct this that would carry a fee. There may be waviness of the areas treated, or over treatment. The results may be asymmetrical. There can be non-infected fluid collections under the skin, which may require drainage. There are the risks of anesthesia which include deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolus and death, which is extremely rare.

What is the recovery time/down-time?
There will be significant swelling and bruising for about 2 weeks. You will be asked to refrain from any strenuous activity for this period.

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Rhinoplasty

Goals of the Procedure
The goal of a rhinoplasty depends entirely on your individual goals, and can include making the nose smaller, straighter, changing the nasal tip and various other possibilities. This is done by molding the nasal bones and/or the cartilage.

Where are the scars?
Typically there will be a very small scar underneath the nose and then scars on the inside of the nose, which will not be visible.

Who is a good candidate?
You are a good candidate for this procedure if there are specific aspects of your nose that you do not like.

Who may not be a good candidate?
If you have significant medical conditions that are not well controlled with medication, you may wish to avoid elective surgery.

If you have difficulty breathing, you may be better suited to a functional septo-rhinoplasty.

What are the risks?
With any surgical procedure, there are risks of bleeding and infection. Scars typically heal well, but may heal thicker or redder and so may benefit from further treatment after the procedure. You may have dryness of the nose, or decreased or noisy breathing post-operatively. The aesthetic outcome may not be exactly what you had wanted, and extra procedures may be needed to correct this that would carry a fee. The results may be asymmetrical in terms of overall appearance. There are the risks of anesthesia, which include deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolus, and death, which is extremely rare.

What is the recovery time/down-time?
There will be significant swelling and bruising for about 2 weeks. You will be asked to refrain from any strenuous activity for this period.

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Medial Thigh Lift

Goals of the Procedure
The goal of a medial thigh lift is to improve the contour of the inner thighs. This is done by removing excess skin and fat from the inner thighs.

Where are the scars?
Typically, there is one scar on each inner thigh which will start in the groin area and go down to the inner knee area.

Who is a good candidate?
You are a good candidate for this procedure if you find you have excess skin and to a lesser extent, excess fat in this area. If there is significant excess fat, it may be advisable to do liposuction to the area first as an independent procedure and then proceed with the lift separately. This is a great procedure for people who have lost a significant amount of weight.

Who may not be a good candidate?
If you have significant medical conditions that are not well controlled with medication, you may wish to avoid elective surgery.

If there is both significant excess fat and skin, you may be a better candidate for 2 procedures, the first where fat is reduced via liposuction, and the second where excess skin is removed. This can be discussed and decided during your consultation.

What are the risks?
Like with any surgical procedure, there are risks of bleeding and infection. Scars typically heal well, but may heal thicker or redder and so may benefit from further treatment after the procedure. The scars are in a visible area. There is a small risk that a nerve is damaged during the procedure, which can cause temporary or permanent changes in sensation to the area treated and/or to an area of the leg. There is a risk of damaging lymphatic channels, which can lead to lymphedema – swelling of the leg that can be difficult to treat. The aesthetic outcome may not be exactly what you had wanted, and extra procedures may be needed to correct this which would carry an additional cost. There may be contour abnormalities of the area treated. The results may be asymmetrical. There can be non-infected fluid collections under the skin which may require drainage. There are the risks of anaesthesia which include vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolus and death, which is extremely rare.

What is the recovery time/down-time?
There will be significant swelling and bruising for about 2 weeks. You will be asked to refrain form any strenuous activity for about 6 weeks.

 

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Botox Injections

Goals of the Procedure
The goal of Botox injections are generally to reduce the dynamic wrinkles of the face – that is those wrinkles that are not present when your face is at rest. The classic ones are the “eleven’s” just over the nose, forehead wrinkles, crows feet next to the eyes and bunny lines around the nose. It can also be used, typically in conjunction with fillers, to produce a “soft lift” – a general rejuvenation of the face.

Where are the scars?
Small needles are used to introduce the medication and so there are typically no scars.

Who is a good candidate?
You are a good candidate for Botox if you have some wrinkles that are not present at rest but appear during expression. Botox may help soften wrinkles that are present at rest, but will not make them disappear. Fillers are a better treatment option for these types of wrinkles. Botox can also be used before wrinkles appear to prevent them from happening. Botox is a great treatment for people in their late 20s and beyond. Botox is a great procedure for facial rejuvenation with minimal downtime.

Who may not be a good candidate?
If you have significant medical conditions that are not well controlled with medication, or you have any neuromuscular disorders, you may want to avoid Botox. You should also avoid Botox if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.

What are the risks?
While downtime is typically minimal, there are risks of bruising with Botox. There may be pain with injection. There is a risk of a drooping eyelid (ptosis), which can last for several weeks, but this can be treated with eye drops. There may be facial asymmetry and/or peaked eyebrow, but injecting more Botox can usually treat this. Some uses are “off-label” which means that, while they are commonly used, they may not be strictly approved by Health Canada. Effects of Botox are temporary. To maintain effect, Botox will need to be re-injected every 3-6 months. Botox may not be the appropriate treatment for certain concerns where a facelift, eyelift etc. may be more appropriate. The aesthetic outcome may not be exactly what you had wanted, and extra procedures may be needed to correct this which would carry an additional cost.

What is the recovery time/down-time?
Usual downtime is minimal. You are asked to avoid strenuous physical activity for 12 hours and to avoid touching your face or lying flat for 4 hours after injection. Botox will take 3-5 days to take effect.

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Filler Injections

Goals of the Procedure
The goal of filler injections are generally to rejuvenate the face by adding volume that has been lost due to the aging process. Also, filler may be used to augment the lips, reduce facial creases and diminish fixed wrinkles. Fillers can also be used, typically in conjunction with Botox, to produce a “soft lift” – a general rejuvenation of the face.

What are “fillers”?
There are many different types of fillers used, but the type most commonly used is based on hyaluronic acid, a molecule found naturally in the human body. This molecule adds volume temporarily to the area into which in is injected. It naturally disappears with time.

Where are the scars?
Small needles are used to introduce the medication and so there are typically no scars.

Who is a good candidate?
You are a good candidate for fillers if you wish to rejuvenate the face by replacing lost facial volume, reduce the appearance of facial creases, and/or diminish the appearance of fixed wrinkles. Fillers are also a good way to add volume to the lips. Fillers are a great treatment for people in their late 20s and beyond. Fillers are a great procedure for facial rejuvenation with minimal downtime.

Who may not be a good candidate?
If you have significant medical conditions that are not well controlled with medication, or have any known allergies to components of a filler, you may wish to avoid fillers. Fillers are also not recommended if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.

What are the risks?
While downtime is typically minimal, there are risks of bruising with fillers. There may be pain with injection. There is risk of contour abnormality (lumpiness), which may need treatment with a medication that dissolves the filler. There may be facial asymmetry. Some uses are “off-label” which means that, while commonly used, they may not be strictly approved by Health Canada. Effects of fillers are temporary, and so to maintain effect, fillers will need to be re-injected every 6-12 months. Fillers may not be the appropriate treatment for certain concerns where surgery, for example, a facelift, neck lift etc. may be better suited to address the concern. The aesthetic outcome may not be exactly what you had wanted and extra procedures may be needed to correct this, which would carry additional costs. There can be skin necrosis after a filler injection which could require reconstructive surgery. There can be loss of vision after filler injection around the eyes. There can be granulomas (inflammatory lump) after filler injection.

What is the recovery time/down-time?
Usual downtime is minimal. It may take several days for bruising to resolve if bruising is present.

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